Posts Tagged ‘sbs 2003 to sbs 2011 migration’

Welcome to my series of short tips on migrations. Whilst based on Microsoft migrations the same principles can be applied to any type of migration.

My first tip Migration Tip #1 – Source Server Health can be found here: https://demazter.wordpress.com/2011/06/12/migration-tip-1-source-server-health/

My second tip Migration Tip #2 – The Practice Run can be found here: https://demazter.wordpress.com/2011/06/14/migration-tip-2-%e2%80%93-the-practice-run/

My third tip Migration Tip #3 – Preparing for Live Migration can be found here: https://demazter.wordpress.com/2011/06/15/migration-tip-3-preparing-for-live-migration/

My fourth top Migration Tip #4 – The Migration can be found here: https://demazter.wordpress.com/2011/06/16/migration-tip-4-the-migration/

My fifth tip is based around testing and clearing up after the migration.  You’ve done all the hardwork, it would be a real shame to get this far and to encounter problems when you start to remove the old system.

Check over your work, do some test shutdowns of the old system.  Making sure that all users, data and systems are all operational during the shutdown.  Even go as far as to turn the system off for a week before you actually remove it from the network.  Making sure you tell your users that you are doing this and that any glitches you want to know about.  Believe me, all too often they will put up with a glitch and won’t tell you about it, until it’s too late.  You need to make it very clear that no matter how small you need to know about it during this “down” time.  It’s easier to resolve when the system is available than it is when it’s no longer part of your network.

There may be additional tasks you will need to perform once the old system is decomissioned.  These could include (but are not limited to):

  • Backups, check you are backing up the data/system in it’s new location.
  • Data flow, check that any dataflow in, out and around your network/systems have been updated to accomodate the changes you have made.  for example if it’s an Exchange migration, make sure that the firewall rules that control mailflow have been updated.  If it’s a SQL Database, make sure that any scripts/log shipping/etc have been modified. 
  • Check any internal/external DNS entries have been modified if required.  If migrating to the cloud these will be external changes, if internal migrations then they will be internal changes.
  • Check that any systems that interact with what has been migrated are still functioning, MFD’s, Fax Machines, NAS  devices etc etc.  The list is endless and only you will know what devices/systems you have in place.  Check them all.
  • Check with your users that they are happy that all of what they need access to is working and functioning as they expect it to.
  • Update your network documentation, do this now, whilst it’s still fresh in your mind.

Finally, once all that has been completed and you are happy that everything is working, decomission the old system.  Making sure of course you take a final backup before you do so.  Make sure you follow the correct procedure for removing the system you are migrating away from.  Don’t just turn it off and take it away.  Not following the correct procedure, can and will effect your network and any future migrations.

This is my final migration tip, I hope you have found them useful.  Please watch out for my next migration guide which will be available in the next few weeks which is Migrating Small Business Server 2008 to Small Business Server 2011.

If you are planning on a migration and are not comfortable with the process then Demazter IT Services can assist you. Please contact me on glen@demazter.co.uk.

All versions of Microsoft Exchange and Small Business Server require the use of an SSL Certificate. Whilst they will quite happily use a self-signed certificate a commercial certificate can save a lot of time and hassle, purchase Exchange/SBS SSL Certificates at an excellent price from: http://www.exchangecertificates.com

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Welcome to my series of short tips on migrations. Whilst based on Microsoft migrations the same principles can be applied to any type of migration.

My first tip Migration Tip #1 – Source Server Health can be found here: https://demazter.wordpress.com/2011/06/12/migration-tip-1-source-server-health/

My second tip Migration Tip #2 – The Practice Run can be found here: https://demazter.wordpress.com/2011/06/14/migration-tip-2-%e2%80%93-the-practice-run/

My third tip Migration Tip #3 – Preparing for Live Migration can be found here: https://demazter.wordpress.com/2011/06/15/migration-tip-3-preparing-for-live-migration/

My fourth tip is about the actual migration itself, you’ve done all the preparation, you have practiced and you’ve spoken to everyone with a vested interest.  Now it’s time to do the deed.  The actual migration.

My advice here, is to take your time, nobody will actually get affected by the migration until you move data.  If you are following a guide, then do so religiously.  I made the mistake on my very first migration of skipping a few steps because I thought I knew better.  Even if you think they don’t need doing, do them.  There is a reason these steps are in the guide.

Test each step as you go along, read it, read it again, then perform the step, then double check it.  Make sure you are happy with that the step is completed before you move on to the next one.

If you come across a problem or something you are not sure of, stop.  Don’t continue and think “it’s OK, I will sort that out later”.  Fix it now.  If you can’t fix it find someone who can help you before you move on.  There are some great Q&A sites out there where volunteer experts will help you. http://www.experts-exchange.com being my favourite and where I tend to hang out.  But it’s easier for the experts to help you if you haven’t continued past the problem.  Often continuing will cause you to create a bigger problem which will be more costly in terms of time and possibly money to resolve.

More importantly, if you encounter a problem that means you have to stop the migration then communicate this to the people using the system.  Make sure they know that what was your final deadline may now shift.  This makes sure you are not under any unnecessary pressure, and again, manages their expectation.

Performing a migration can be a stressful tasks, and lots of blue line watching.  So make sure you get away from the system whilst the installations are being performed.  The blue lines will still move if you don’t watch them.  And watching them will make the migration seem like it’s taking all that much longer.

Watch out for tip Migration Tip #5 – The Aftermath

If you are planning on a migration and are not comfortable with the process then Demazter IT Services can assist you. Please contact me on glen@demazter.co.uk.

All versions of Microsoft Exchange and Small Business Server require the use of an SSL Certificate. Whilst they will quite happily use a self-signed certificate a commercial certificate can save a lot of time and hassle, purchase Exchange/SBS SSL Certificates at an excellent price from: http://www.exchangecertificates.com

Welcome to my series of short tips on migrations. Whilst based on Microsoft migrations the same principles can be applied to any type of migration.

My first tip Migration Tip #1 – Source Server Health can be found here: https://demazter.wordpress.com/2011/06/12/migration-tip-1-source-server-health/

My second tip Migration Tip #2 – The Practice Run can be found here: https://demazter.wordpress.com/2011/06/14/migration-tip-2-%e2%80%93-the-practice-run/

So, we now have a healthy source server and you have practice until the match sticks snap what next?

My third tip is about making sure you are prepared for the task ahead. Any type of migration needs to be taken seriously, it is a business critical operation you are about to embark on. If you are in any doubt about it at all, now is the time to say so, and if necessary call in help.

If you are happy with the process and confident you are able to complete the steps to achieve your goal then the next thing we need to do is plan a time to do it.

Most migrations are not time limited other than SBS to SBS migrations that have a limit of 21 days where both SBS servers can co-exist at the same time.

Make people aware of what you are doing, involve them, explain that you are expecting to have teething problems but would prefer if they collated them and then passed them to you when you ask for them. The last thing you want is to try trouble shooting whilst trying to complete a migration.

Find out if there is anything business critical happening (a big bid/contract etc that needs to be out just when you take the mail system offline) that could be delayed by the work you are carrying out, and if so, delay your migration. Talk to absolutely every member of staff. Manage Expectation.

In reality, if you get it bang on, the end users shouldn’t even notice and I would say 99% of the migrations I have done this has been the case. But there is always the odd one.

Have a recovery plan, know how to back out of what you are doing if it does go pear shaped. If you need to lock and migrate huge amounts of data then make sure you plan this stage of the migration for when people aren’t going to be using the system as heavily.

Document what you are doing, make notes of which stage you have got to and what action you have just taken.  This might seem like a waste of time, but take it from someone who has picked up a few failed migrations from people just like yourself, it’s not.  Knowing exactly what stage you are at will help a consultant very quickly get to grips with the situation and this means a faster resolution.

And, most importantly of all, make sure you have backups! Take more than one, take one off-site, and do it different ways. I like to have a backup on either removable storage so I can access it quickly but also on tape just to be sure.

Watch out for tip Migration Tip #4 – The Migration

If you are planning on a migration and are not comfortable with the process then Demazter IT Services can assist you. Please contact me on glen@demazter.co.uk.

All versions of Microsoft Exchange and Small Business Server require the use of an SSL Certificate. Whilst they will quite happily use a self-signed certificate a commercial certificate can save a lot of time and hassle, purchase Exchange/SBS SSL Certificates at an excellent price from: http://www.exchangecertificates.com/

Welcome to my series of short tips on migrations. Whilst based on Microsoft migrations the same principles can be applied to any type of migration.

My first tip Migration Tip #1 – Source Server Health can be found here: https://demazter.wordpress.com/2011/06/12/migration-tip-1-source-server-health/

My second tip is about making sure you are familiar with the technology you are migrating to.

For many people, migrating to a new technology will be the first and only time they perform this task. So, it’s always a good idea to familiarise yourself with the setup process before you do it for real.  With the use of virtualisation technologies we can install and test new products without the need for new hardware and without the possible impact on our live environment.

There are a number of virtualisation products that will allow you to do this on your desktop/laptop computer. You need to consider that most new products (if not all) will be based on x64 bit architecture. This does limit the virtualisation technologies that you can use on the desktop. Some of my favourites are listed below.

VMWare Workstation, this is a paid product but worth its weight in gold: http://store.vmware.com/store/vmwde/en_IE/pd/productID.166452200/Currency.GBP/?src=PaidSearch_Google_PersonalDesktop_WKSN_EMEA_UK_EN_Brand
VMWare Server, this is free for use and technically should only be used on a Server Operating System, but it does work on Desktop OS for testing purposes: http://www.vmware.com/products/server/overview.html
Virtual Box: http://www.sun.com/software/products/virtualbox/get.jsp

Whichever technology you use, virtualisation will allow you to install the new software in a test environment, and keep installing it until you are happy with the process. Run through it 2, 3 even 4 times. Make sure you are familiar with the screens and what answers you are going to provide to the wizards. Take notes, even write a step-by-step of what you encountered and when you encountered it. Remember, the more you do now when you are in a safe “sandbox” environment, the easier and less pressurised the real thing will be. Don’t pay too much attention to the actual data you are entering as some of this will change when you do a migration as opposed to a new installation.

For the actual Migration Pick a migration guide for your technologies, it’s always best to use one that’s recommended by others and they have had good success with.  You will find my migration guides here: https://demazter.wordpress.com/category/migration-guides/ I use my guides in my own migrations and update them with any changes as often as possible.  Read the guide thoroughly before you start the migration.   It’s easier to get answers when you are not under pressure to fix things.

If you have the time and the inclination I would also suggest that you convert your physical source server to a virtual one. This will allow you to do a test migration with your actual source server. There are many tools for performing the capture and they depend on the virtualisation technology you are using and whether you want a free or paid product. Some examples of methods that can be used to convert physical machines to virtual ones can be found here: http://4sysops.com/archives/p2v-for-vmware-six-ways-to-convert-physical-to-virtual/

Doing a virtual migration with a virtual copy of your actual source server is a great way to identify any problems you may encounter during the real live migration. You then have the opportunity to rectify these issues and then try the migration again. Once you are happy the migration has worked you are then in a position to do the live backup. I would be doing 3 to 4 virtual migrations just to be absolutely sure.

Watch out for tip Migration Tip #3 – Preparing for Live Migration in the next day or two.

If you are planning on a migration and are not comfortable with the process then Demazter IT Services can assist you. Please contact me on glen@demazter.co.uk.

All versions of Microsoft Exchange and Small Business Server require the use of an SSL Certificate. Whilst they will quite happily use a self-signed certificate a commercial certificate can save a lot of time and hassle, purchase Exchange/SBS SSL Certificates at an excellent price from: http://www.exchangecertificates.com/

Welcome to my series of short tips on migrations. Whilst based on Microsoft migrations the same principles can be applied to any type of migration.

My first tip is around source server preparation.

No migration is an easy migration, there is always potential for something to go wrong. All we can do is try to minimize this risk.

The biggest risk comes from the system we already have in place, the integrity of this system is paramount in ensuring a successful migration.

Making sure your source system is healthy and configured correctly will go a long way to ensuring you have a smooth migration.

Use analyzers and health check tools that are available from the vendor. Microsoft, for example, have a number of best practice analyzer tools. These can be used to identify any problems the system may have and provide advice on how to resolve them. Some of the ones I use regularly are listed below:

Small Business Server 2003 BPA: http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/en/details.aspx?FamilyID=3874527a-de19-49bb-800f-352f3b6f2922&displaylang=en
Small Business Server 2008 BPA: http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/en/details.aspx?familyid=86a1aa32-9814-484e-bd43-3e42aec7f731&displaylang=en
Exchange Server BPA (not for Exchange 2007 or 2010, the built in BPA should be used): http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/en/details.aspx?familyid=dbab201f-4bee-4943-ac22-e2ddbd258df3&displaylang=en
Internet Security and Acceleration Server BPA: http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/en/details.aspx?FamilyID=d22ec2b9-4cd3-4bb6-91ec-0829e5f84063
SQL Server 2005 BPA: http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/en/details.aspx?familyid=da0531e4-e94c-4991-82fa-f0e3fbd05e63&displaylang=en

In a Microsoft migration I will use tools like DCDIAG, NETDIAG, REPLMON and REPADMIN to check for errors, even if it’s a single server. You would be surprised how easy it is to misconfigure a single server. Further details on the usage of these tools can be found here:

DCDIAG: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc773199(WS.10).aspx
NETDIAG: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc782085(WS.10).aspx
REPLMON: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc772954(WS.10).aspx
REPADMIN: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc755360(WS.10).aspx

Make sure the source system is up-to-date. All updates, service packs etc need to be applied. This may seem like a waste of time on a system that you are soon to be migrating out of your network but really it isn’t. New products from the same vendor normally rely on the source system being up-to-date. I have been known to spend hours installing service packs and updates on a source server.

It’s worth spending the time getting this part of the migration perfect. There are no timescales in play here you can take your time, once you start migrating there are pressures at play that will make the slightest hiccup seem like your whole world is imploding. I would consider this part of the migration process the most important, and therefore if you are not comfortable with this process, hire someone who is. Buying in consulting services to make sure the server is health can save you a lot of money.

Watch out for tip Migration Tip #2 – The Practice Run in the next day or two.

If you are planning on a migration and are not comfortable with the process then Demazter IT Services can assist you. Please contact me on glen@demazter.co.uk.

All versions of Microsoft Exchange and Small Business Server require the use of an SSL Certificate. Whilst they will quite happily use a self signed certificate a commercial certificate can save a lot of time and hassle, purchase Exchange/SBS SSL Certificates at an excellent price from: http://www.exchangecertificates.com/

This guide is intended to provide step by step inbeen written using the preview version of SBS2011 therefore some structions on how to migrate from Small Business Server 2003 to Small Business Server 2011.

NOTE: This guide has of the screens may look slightly different on the final release.

Steps required:

  1. Health Checks on Small Business Server 2003
  2. Configure SBS2003 for single NIC
  3. Run Migration Preparation tool on SBS2003 & Create Answerfile
  4. Administrative User Creation
  5. Setting data locations
  6. Configure the Network
  7. Configure the Internet Address
  8. Migrate Exchange Mailboxes and Settings
  9. Remove Legacy Group Policies and Logon Settings
  10. Migrate users’ Shared Data
  11. Migrate Fax Data
  12. Migrate Users and Groups
  13. Uninstall Exchange 2003 from Small Business Server 2003
  14. Check Transfer of the 5 FSMO roles to SBS2011
  15. DCPROMO SBS 2003 server so it is no longer a domain controller and remove from network

Step 1. Health Checks on Small Business Server 2003

The absolute first thing you need to do is take a SYSTEM STATE backup of your Small Business Server as well as a full system backup. There is little chance of the data getting lost but the SYSTEM STATE backup backs up Active Directory so that if it all goes wrong we can recover it if needed.

To do this from using your preferred backup product ensure that System Stare is selected from the selection list then run a backup.

What you then need to do on the SBS 2003 server is to make sure you have all the latest available updates. This means you should at a minimum have:

  • Windows 2003 Service Pack 2 – verify this by right clicking on My Computer and select properties. It should tell you here the Windows Service Pack
  • Windows Small Business Server Service Pack 1 – verify this by checking the registry key HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\SmallBusinessServer\ServicePackNumber you are looking for a value of 1 in the bracket.
  • Microsoft Exchange 2003 Service Pack 2 – verify this using the Exchange System Manager. Navigate to first administrative > Servers. With the Servers folder highlighted on the right hand side you will see the SBS2003 servername with the service pack version listed.

Once you have installed all of the above, run Windows Update and make sure you select the option in the blue banner bar across the top for Microsoft Update. Microsoft Update will then allow you to update all Microsoft products installed on the server providing a more comprehensive update solution. Keep running the check and installing all updates until there are no more available. Further details on this process can be found in my article here: https://demazter.wordpress.com/2010/06/21/get-more-from-windows-updates/

Check the health of your Active Directory by running DCDIAG, if there is anything reported as an error fix it before moving on.

A common problem that can cause this migration to fail is that the SBS 2003 server does not have its own IP address listed for DNS in the network properties under TCP/IP. If this is the case, update it so that it does (do not use the loopback 127.0.0.1 address).

Step 2 – Configure SBS2003 for single NIC

Before you can migrate from SBS2003 it needs to be configured in a single NIC configuration and ISA server (if in use) needs to be removed.

To do this uninstall the ISA components from Add/Remove programmes.

You may also need an additional internet router appropriate for the type of connection you use. This should support NAT and needs to be configured with an IP address to match the internal NIC on your server.

Once you have done this, disable the second NIC and then run the Connect to the Internet Wizard to ensure SBS2003 is configured correctly.

I would then suggest a reboot to ensure that all these changes are taken in to effect.

Step 3. Run Migration Preparation tool on SBS2003 & Create Answerfile

As part of the Migration Preparation tool it will run the best practice analyzer to identify any issues with the current setup. Before you run the tool you will need to download and install from Microsoft Baseline Configuration Analyzer which can be downloaded from: http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/en/details.aspx?familyid=1B6E9026-F505-403E-84C3-A5DEA704EC67&displaylang=en

We can then run the wizard by inserting the SBS2011 DVD in to the SBS2003 server drive. Allow it to autoplay and you should see the following screen. If you don’t have a DVD drive in the SBS2003 server then there are a few options. Either use a USB DVD Drive, share the drive out from another workstation that does have a DVD drive, or copy the contents of the SBS2011 DVD to the SBS2003 server hard drive. The folders you require specifically are TOOLS and SOURCES. If you copy these 2 folders then instead of seeing the link below you will need to run the SourceTool installer from the TOOLS folder.

From here we need to select the option for Install the Migration Preparation Tool. The first screen we will see asks about getting and installing installation updates. My recommendation here would be to not install updates unless you are encountering an issue that has been identified by the SBS team and you are following specific advice regarding this. (screen below)

Once you have made your choice, the following screen will ask you to confirm that you have an adequate backup of the SBS system. Obviously the data needs to be backed up. But the important thing that needs to be backed up that is often missed is the System State Backup. This includes Active Directory and will be needed to recover with should the migration fail. (screen below)

Once you check the box to say you have a backup and click next you will see the screen below. This is preparing Exchange and Active Directory for the introduction of your new SBS2011 server. We are looking for 4 green ticks here.

Once this has completed click next. The next stage is the Migration Wizard will use the baseline analyzer tools you installed earlier to check the organisation for any misconfigurations that should cause the migration to fail (screen below)

This could take a few minutes but what we are hoping to see is the screen below that says we have no errors. This means we are ready to proceed with the introduction of the new server.

Clicking Next to move on will tell us the source server has been successfully (image below) prepared and give us the option to view the migration guide. At time of writing this article there was no migration content on the link provided.

The second option is to create an answer file. This is essential for the successful migration to SBS2011 so click this option and complete with the detail as illustrated below. The reason I select these options is that it then asks you to confirm some information at the installation stage. Almost like a second check before proceeding. One of the key options is not to perform any updates. This can be done after the migration, and with my experience from SBS2008 migrations these updates have been known to make changes which cause the migration to fail.

Now we need to save the answer file using the save option. Once done, copy it to a USB drive and place this in your new server along with the SBS2011 DVD and post up.

The first screen we see is the language and keyboard selection screen (image below)

Make the appropriate selections and click next.

We then see the screen below. Click Install Now

We are then presented with the usual License Agreement screen (below). Put a check in the check box and click Next. Obviously only if you agree to the licensing terms as set out by Microsoft.

The following screen (below) provides any storage that has already been configured on your new hardware. If you don’t see anything here you will need to load 3rd party drivers from your vendor using the Load Driver option. If you still don’t see anything listed then you may need to configure your RAID Controller so that there is a volume, most will do this by default on first boot if you don’t select to configure yourself, but some might not.

Once you have made the appropriate selections click next and we will see the usual Windows 2008 R2 component configuration and file copy screen as below.

Once this has finished the server will reboot and display the screen below. As this is a migration we will be selecting Server Migration and then click next.

The screen below is the time zone and date/time selection screen. It is absolutely essential that this matches the source server otherwise connection to the domain and promotion to a domain controller will fail.

Verify the time zone and date/time then click Next.

The screen below asks you to verify the source server IP address, the IP address you wish to assign the new server and the gateway address. Confirm the details and then click next.

The next screen is more confirmation. This time it is the source server name and internal domain name along with the administrative user details and the source server name.

Confirm the details, and even retype the password just to be sure. Then click Next.

We then see the update screen below. Again, my recommendation here would be to not install udates. And then click next.

The screen below is your company details, this will be used on Companyweb/Remote Web Workplace. Fill in the form an click next.

We then see the screen below which is the start of the SBS2011 component installation, this could take around 30-45 minutes and you can expect the server to reboot at least once during this phase.

Once this has finished you should be presented with the SBS2011 desktop and the screen below. This means that the installation phase of the migration has been completed.

If there were any problems with the migration you would see a troubleshooting assistant informing you of what has failed and how to correct it.

Step 4. Administrative User Creation

Now that SBS2011 has been successfully installed and you have logged in for the first time we will see SBS console. Those of you familiar with SBS2008 will notice that not much has changed.

As with SBS2008 most of the tasks we need to complete need to be performed with an Administrative user other than the built in Administrator account. This was not the case with SBS2003 and you probably do not have another Administrative user. If this is not completed we will receive the error below when trying to launch the Migration Wizard.

So the first step is to create this user.

Using the SBS Console select the Users and Groups option across the top of the console. You will then see the screen as illustrated below.

There will be no users listed here, don’t panic, this is perfectly normal. You will not see the existing users in the SBS Console until the migration is complete.

Click on the Add a new user account on the right hand side. This will launch the new user wizard.

Enter the details for your user. The important part is that you select Network Administrator as the User Role. Once you are done click next.

The following screen we are asked to enter a password for the user, enter a password and click Add User Account.

We then see the following screen, this can take a few minutes to complete but what we are looking for is 5 green ticks. If for any reason any of the stages fail the final screen will tell you what failed and why.

The following screen allows us to associate computers with this user or add an additional computer. There is no need to do this for the new Administrative User. Click finish to exit the wizard. From the SBS Console select the Home section and click Migrate to Windows SBS to start the migration tasks.

Step 5. Setting data locations

When launching the migration wizard there is a list of tasks to complete. These should be done in the order they are presented. As illustrated below.

The first task is to set the data locations for Exchange, Sharepoint, Shared Folders, Redirected My Documents and Windows Software Update Services. The wizards are the same for each so this guide will only run through one of them.

NOTE: If you don’t have a second volume configured there is no need to run this part. If you try to you will receive the following error.

If you do not have a second volume and don’t intend to have one, then on the first screen of the wizard put a check in the Task Complete radio and click next.

To run the wizards click the hyperlinks on the above screen one by one. The first screen (below) is simply the summary of what you will be doing, click next when ready.

The next screen runs a check of the configuration, one of the tasks this is completing is checking for available volumes and disk space for the files to be moved to.

Once this is complete we are given the options of locations to select from. At this stage because we have not configured a backup you will see an error that this has not been done. Click OK to continue.

Make the drive selection and then click Move. What we want to see is the screen below indicating that the move has been successful. Click finish and then move on to the next hyperlink to continue setting the data locations.

Step 6. Configure the Network

The next task the wizards want us to complete is the Configure the Network wizard. This is the Connect to the Internet Wizard.

When launched, the first screen we see is the one below. From here we need to select the Start the Connect to the Internet Wizard hyper link.

The following screen will give you a summary of some information that will be required to allow the wizard to be completed.

Make sure you have this information to hand and click Next.

The next screen does a check of the network configuration and will attempt to discover among other things your router. Part of these checks will also detect if there are any other DHCP services running on the network.

The wizard will not continue if another DHCP service is detected (see image below). Therefore if you plan to use another device for DHCP then this must be temporarily disabled to allow you to complete this task. I would however recommend that you do use SBS2011 for DHCP rather than another device.

Once you have disabled any DHCP services the wizard will move on and display what it has detected from your network configuration.

Check the information is correct and if so click Next. If not make any appropriate changes before clicking next.

Once done, we are looking for the big green tick as illustrated below that says our network has been configured.

Step 7. Configure the Internet Address

The 3rd task in the migration wizard is to Configure the Internet Address this wizard is for configuring the external domain you intend to use with the SBS2011 server.

The first screen we see is a summary screen explaining what the wizard will do.

Click the hyperlink for Start the Internet Address Wizard and then read the guidance on the screen below.

As this is a migration you will probably already have an external domain name and it will already be configured. The rest of this guide will assume you have a domain name registered and that you will use the control panel from your ISP to manage your External DNS. Click Next to start the configuration.

On the following screen, select the I already have a domain name that I want to use and click Next.

On this screen select the I want to manage the domain name myself and click Next.

The following screen we need to enter the external domain name we will be using, this will be the domain name used in the hyperlink for Remote Web Workplace, Outlook Web App, ActiveSync and will be used to create your email address.

Clicking the Advanced Settings link will allow us to reconfigure the name that appears in the self-signed SSL certificate from remote.domainname.com to something else. If you have mail.domainname.com or owa.domainname.com setup currently then this is where you would enter this information.

Once done click the configure button and the wizard will make the necessary changes. Once completed we want to see the summary screen as below. We are looking for 3 green ticks to say it has been successful.

Step 8. Migrate Exchange Mailboxes and Settings

The next step of the Migration process is to migrate the Exchange Mailboxes and Public Folders. When we launch the wizard for this task we see the following screen.

Clicking the hyperlink (at time of writing) takes you to the technet article for Migrating Mailboxes. To do this, we need to delve in to the Exchange Management Console. Click Start > All Programs > Microsoft Exchange Server 2010 and select Exchange Management Console.

Once the console has launched, navigate to Recipient Configuration > Mailbox. Here we should see all our mailboxes listed. All the mailboxes that appear as Legacy Mailbox are currently located on the SBS2003 servers mailstore.

You can either batch select the mailboxes using SHIFT or CTRL or do each mailbox one by one. Once you have selected the mailboxes to move, from the Action Pane on the right hand side select New Local Move Request. This will start the move mailbox wizard.

From the first screen click the browse button to select the Mailbox Store on the new SBS2011 Server. Once you have done this click Next.

For this screen, leave it at defaults for the first run. If you find that mailboxes fail to move due to corrupt items you may have to increase the value here to allow those corrupt items to be skipped and for the mailbox to move successfully.

The screen above is simply a summary of what task you will be performing, clicking the New button will start the mailbox moves.

Once complete, we are looking for the following screen, all green ticks.

If you are moving the mailboxes in batches then repeat this task until all mailboxes have been moved to the SBS2011 server.

The next stage is to migrate the Public Folders. To do this, complete the following steps on the SBS 2003 Server:

  1. Click Start > All Programs > Microsoft Exchange Server > System Manager
  2. Navigate to Administrative Groups > First Administrative Group > Servers > Servername > First Storage Group
  3. Right click on the Public Folder Store and select Move All Replicas. The only option that should appear in the list is your Exchange 2010 server. Click OK.

Now that we have moved the data to the SBS2011 server it’s best to leave the Exchange Settings as is for a day or so to a) make sure all the data is moved before we perform any other Exchange related tasks. b) Allow all the outlook clients to update automatically with the new server settings. We can now continue with the rest of the migration.

Step 9. Remove Legacy Group Policies and Logon Settings

The next step is to remove any Legacy Group Policies and Logon Configurations that are incompatible with SBS2011. The recommendation here is that any logon scripts in use should be migrated to Group Policies and/or Group Policy preferences. However in my experience it doesn’t cause any problems if this is not done.

Further information on these processes can be found here:

Remove old logon scripts for Windows SBS migration: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc527605(WS.10).aspx

Remove old Active Directory Group Policy objects for Windows SBS 2008 migration: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc527585(WS.10).aspx

Step 10. Migrate users’ Shared Data

This is another task where you need to perform the configuration manually. The steps required can be found here: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc527517(WS.10).aspx

Once you have the shares configured a simple backup of the SBS2003 server and restore to the 2011 server will restore all data with associated permissions.

Alternatively you could use robocopy which is part of the Windows 2003 Resource Kit which can be downloaded from: http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/en/details.aspx?familyid=9d467a69-57ff-4ae7-96ee-b18c4790cffd&displaylang=en

There is also command line reference for robocopy here: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc733145(WS.10).aspx

Step 11. Migrate Fax Data

There is no fax function in SBS2011 (this may change in the final release) but if you already have Fax data stored on the SBS2003 server you will need to migrate this data.

Launching the wizard will display the following screen.

Clicking the hyperlink Click to start Migrating your fax data this will move the data to the new server. At this stage if there is no fax services installed/configured on the SBS2003 server you will receive the error displayed below.

This is not a problem and can be ignored, mark this task as complete.

Step 12. Migrate Users and Groups

As part of joining the SBS2011 server to the domain which contains SBS2003 and making it a Domain Controller it has already got a copy of the Active Directory and all the users and groups.

However, they will not appear in the SBS Console, this is normal and can be resolved following the instructions here.

To allow the users to be seen a new role needs to be applied. To do this on the first screen the wizard shows a hyperlink to Run the change user role wizard as illustrated below.

Click this link, to start the wizard. From the list displayed select the role you wish to assign to these users.

On the following screen put a check in the box for Display all user accounts in the Active Directory as illustrated below. This will display all of the users. Highlight your existing user then click the Add button to move them to the right hand side.

Click the change user role button. We are looking for a screen similar to the one below with lots of green ticks to confirm the roles have changed.

Step 13 – Uninstall Exchange 2003 from Small Business Server 2003

Hopefully you are arriving at this step a day or two after you have migrated all the mailboxes, if not then I would recommend you leave it for a day or two just to allow all client computers to automatically update the Exchange server setting in outlook. If you uninstall Exchange 2003 from the Small Business Server and this hasn’t happened then the clients will have to be changed manually.

To perform this task we will need Small Business Server 2003 CD 2, which will be asked for during the uninstallation. Before we can do this though, there are a few steps we need to perform otherwise we will not be able to uninstall it.

If you use Recipient Policies that are Manage Mailbox policies, then these will need to be removed. Likewise, if you have Recipient Policies that are used for both e-mail address definition and mailbox management, the settings defined under Mailbox Manager Settings will need to be removed. You DO NOT need to remove your e-mail address policies.

The Recipient Update Service is not used in Exchange 2010 and is therefore not required, so it can be removed. To do this you will need to use ADSI Edit. This can be done by using the following procedure:

  1. Click Start > Run > MMC > Click OK
  2. Select File then Add/Remove Snap-in
  3. Click Add and select ADSI Edit and click Add, then close and OK
  4. Right click on the ADSI Edit and select ‘Connect to’. From the drop down under ‘Select a well known Naming Context’, select Configuration and click OK
  5. Expand Configuration > Services > Microsoft Exchange > Organisation Name > Address List Container > Recipient Update Services

Right click on Recipient Update Service (Enterprise Configuration) and select Delete. There may also be a Recipient Update Service (ORGNAME) this also needs to be deleted

Only delete the Recipient Update Service entries under the container; DO NOT delete the container itself or any other entries

The final step in preparation for uninstalling Exchange Server 2003 is to delete the routing group connectors that would have been created as part of the installation. I have highlighted them in the image below. Simply right click on each connector and select delete.

We are now ready to uninstall Exchange 2003. To do this, navigate to Start > Control Panel > Add or Remove Programs. From the list of installed applications, highlight Windows Small Business Server 2003 and click Change/Remove.

Click next on the Welcome screen, and next on the screen that follows. Once the component screen opens pull down the drop down next to Exchange Server and select remove, as shown below. Then click next and next again.

Step 14. Check Transfer of the 5 FSMO roles to SBS2011

All of the 5 FSMO roles should already have been transferred to the SBS2011 as part of the installation process but it’s always worth a check. The steps below will give instructions on how to do this if required.

Caution needs to be taken when performing this next step.[/b] I would advise that ALL of the previous steps need to be completed before this is done as Small Business Server MUST hold all 5 FSMO roles.

Once you are ready, the roles can be transferred as follows. Working on the Windows 2008 server do the following:

  1. Click Start > Administrative Tools > Active Directory Users and Computers
  2. Right click on the domain name and select Operations Masters. You will see the screen below.
  3. On each tab (RID, PDC & Infrastructure) click the change button.
  4. Accept the confirmation that you want each role to be transferred.

That is 3 of the 5 roles transferred. To do the next one, which is the Domain Naming Master we need to do the following:

  1. Click Start > Administrative Tools > Active Directory Domains and Trusts.
  2. Right click where it says Active Directory Domains and Trusts and select Operations Master.
  3. Once again click the Change button and say yes to the notification dialog.

4 down with 1 to go. To move the Schema Master role we need to do the following:

  1. Click Start > Run and type regsvr32 schmmgmt.dll
  2. Click OK to the confirmation
  3. Click Start > Run and type MMC and click OK
  4. Select File > Add/Remove Snap-in from the console
  5. From the list select Active Directory Schema, click Add
  6. Click Close and OK.
  7. Right click on Active Directory Schema and select Change Active Directory Domain Controller
  8. Choose the Windows 2008 Server from the list and click OK
  9. Click OK on the warning Dialog box.
  10. Right click on Active Directory Schema and select Operations Master
  11. Click the Change button and say yes to the notification dialog

That’s all the FSMO roles transferred from the Small Business 2003 Server. The next and final step is to demote the server from being a Domain Controller.

Step 15. DCPROMO SBS 2003 server so it is no longer a domain controller and remove from network

This is the final step of the migration process. If you have made it this far, well done! This is the easy bit!

At this point it is worth double checking that both the SBS2003 and SBS2011 server are both configured to use the SBS2011 server for DNS in the TCP/IP properties of the NIC. The only DNS entry should be the IP address of the SBS2011 server.

The first thing we need to do is make sure the SBS2003 is no longer a Global Catalog Server. Click on Start > Administrative Tools > Active Directory Sites and Services. Locate the Small Business Server

Right click on NTDS settings located under the Small Business Server and select properties. Remove the check from the Global Catalog check box and click OK. Close Active Directory Sites and Services snap-in.

The final step is to run DCPROMO. To do this, do the following:

Click Start > Run and type DCPROMO and click OK

Click next on the Welcome screen

DO NOT check the box that says “This server is the last domain controller in the domain” and Click next

Enter a new administrator password for the local administrator user and click next

The server will then remove Active Directory Services from the SBS2003 server and it will no longer be a Domain Controller.

Once this has finished, allow the server to restart, login and then shut it down. You have now completed the migration.

If you are still with me, well done! There are a few sections of additional reading below if you would like to know some more detail about some of the processes we have just completed. There is an excellent article from EE Expert tigermatt around the purpose of the FSMO roles which you will find under the further reading section.

Further Reading

You will also need a trusted SSL Certificate which can be purchased from http://www.exchangecertificates.com

Move/Migrate Sharepoint Services: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc288664.aspx

Move last legacy Exchange Server: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb288905(EXCHG.80).aspx

Demystifying the Active Directory FSMO Roles by tigermatt: http://www.experts-exchange.com/articles/Software/Server_Software/File_Servers/Active_Directory/Demystifying-the-Active-Directory-FSMO-Roles.html

Introduction

Domain Names are a critical part of your Windows Environment.  The DNS (Domain Name System) is a foundation upon which Active Directories and Resources rely upon.  It can be a real problem if you need to go back and change your Domain Name.

So, before building your Windows domain it is important to choose the “correct” domain name.  Wherever possible you need to try and plan ahead, of course you cannot plan for company name changes or, a take over in years to come, because you simply don’t know about them. But….we can plan to be flexible, and we must consider technical and ownership issues at the same time.

Choosing your domain name

Whilst most people believe that the internal windows domain name needs to be something.local this isn’t strictly true.  While it is often easier if the suffix is .local, strictly speaking, it doesn’t have to be.  Let’s consider that point…

Some of the largest enterprises in the world use their external domain name on their internal network.  The most important consideration is that if you use domainname.com that you actually own domainname.com.

Why is this important? One of the main reasons that this is becoming a problem in recent days is because of 3rd Party SSL Certificates that are used to secure Small Business Server and/or Exchange 2007/2010. One of the default requirements for these systems is using the internal fully qualified domain name of your Exchange Server.

So by way of example let’s say you have an internal domain name of virtualdomain.com and your external domain name is abc.com.

When setting up an Exchange 2007/2010 server you would need to request an SSL Certificate that contained the following names:

  • Autodiscover.abc.com
  • owa.abc.com
  • exchangeserver.virtualdomain.com

When you request a certificate with these names in the first thing the Certificate Authority (CA) will do is perform a WHOIS lookup on the names you have requested. Anything .abc.com will show as your company owning the registration.

However when the CA performs a WHOIS lookup on exchangserver.virtualdomain.com they find that the registrant of this domain is a different company and therefore send them a request to authorise the name. Worse, if they don’t find a registrant for the domain then it is removed from the certificate request.

Can you see the problem?  If you own virtualdomain.com then by all means use it in your internal domain name.  If you don’t own it then don’t use it.

This is why most consultants will opt to use the .local suffix on internal domains.  Because when the CA receives a request .local they know it’s not an internet suffix and they will authorise it.

Now what about the dreaded company rename?…..Another common misconception is that when setting up a Windows Domain you must use the domain name for which you want to receive email for.  This is completely untrue.

You can configure Small Business Server and all versions of Microsoft Exchange Server to receive emails for any domain name, regardless of your internal domain name.  So let us now consider calling your internal domain name mydomain.local?

  • It is not linked to a specific company name
  • it will allow you to receive emails for your abc.com email domain
  • if you change your company name you don’t need to worry about trying to change the domain name so the new owner (or existing one) doesn’t have to see the old company name day in day out?
  • because it has a .local suffix you will never run in to problems in the future with SSL Certificates

Conclusion

With wider use of SSL certificates and a few common misconceptions created by the industry, it is important to deliberate over your internal domain name selection.  It’s also important to think ahead.

What might be a good idea or even a bit of a laugh now, could come back to bite you in the rear in a few year’s time.  So, be careful and conservative when choosing your name.

I personally like to give my domains something non-descript, because I do a lot of work for small businesses which can and often do get taken over.  I had one company that was bought out twice within the space of 3 years. I also had one company that split in to 2 companies and then both renamed themselves.

It can get messy and especially with Small Business Server where the internal domain name cannot be renamed, it can be impractical to use company specific domain names.

Of course there is always the case where the owner wants this but it’s our job as consultants to advise them why this isn’t a good idea.  And if they still want it then get it in writing 🙂

This guide is intended to provide step by step instructions on how to migrate from Small Business Server 2003 to Windows 2008 R2 with Exchange 2010.

For this migration to work you will need the following software:

Steps required:

  1. Health Checks on Small Business Server 2003
  2. Join new Windows 2008 Server to the domain as a member server
  3. Prepare Active Directory for Windows 2008 R2 Server
  4. Make Windows 2008 R2 Server a Domain Controller of the Existing Small Business Server 2003 Domain
  5. Transfer DHCP Service
  6. Install Exchange 2010
  7. Installing Exchange 2010 SSL Certificate
  8. Migrate Exchange Data
  9. Migrate SharePoint Services
  10. Migrate shared user data
  11. Uninstall Exchange 2003 from Small Business Server 2003
  12. Transfer all 5 FSMO roles to Windows 2008 Domain Controller
  13. DCPROMO SBS 2003 server so it is no longer a domain controller and remove from network

It’s important that the steps are followed in order as different stages make different changes to the way in which your server operates.  For example you MUST make the 2008 server a domain controller before you install Exchange.

Step 1 – Health Checks on Small Business Server 2003

The absolute first thing you need to do is take a SYSTEM STATE backup of your Small Business Server as well as a full system backup.  There is little chance of the data getting lost but the SYSTEM STATE backup backs up Active Directory so that if it all goes wrong we can recover it if needed.

What you then need to do on the SBS 2003 server is to make sure you have all the latest available updates.  This means you should at a minimum have:

  • Windows 2003 Service Pack 2
  • Windows Small Business Server Service Pack 1
  • Microsoft Exchange 2003 Service Pack 2

Once you have installed all of the above, run Windows Update and make sure you select the option in the blue banner bar across the top for Microsoft Update.  Microsoft Update will then allow you to update all Microsoft products installed on the server providing a more comprehensive update solution.  Keep running the check and installing all updates until there are no more available.

Check the health of your Active Directory by running DCDIAG, if there is anything reported as an error fix it before moving on.

Run the Small Business Server 2003 Best Practices Analyser from here:  http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?familyid=3874527A-DE19-49BB-800F-352F3B6F2922&displaylang=en

Make sure you fix any problems the analyser identifies. If you cannot, then why not raise a question on Experts Exchange to have the Experts there help you?

A common problem that can cause this migration to fail is that the SBS 2003 server does not have its own IP address listed for DNS in the network properties under TCP/IP.  If this is the case, update it so that it does (do not use the loopback 127.0.0.1 address).

Step 2 – Join new Windows 2008 Server to the domain as a member server

To join a Windows 2008 Server to the Small Business Server domain we need to first ensure that it is receiving a correct IP Address

Allow the Windows 2008 Server to receive a DHCP Address from your Small Business Server.  Run an IPCONFIG /ALL to check this.  The DNS Server entry is probably the most important. This should be configured to use the IP Address of your Small Business Server for DNS.

To test, it might be worth just pinging the SBS 2003 server from a command prompt just to check the name can be resolved by doing the following:

  • Click Start > Run > type CMD and then click OK
  • type PING SBS2003SERVERNAME

If you get a good response then we can try and join the 2008 server to the domain.

To Join the Server to the Domain, do the following:

  • Click Start and right click on Computer and select properties
  • From the screen that opens under the section called Computer name, domain, and workgroup settings click Change settings.  Then click on Change
  • At this point if you haven’t already specified the name of your new server you can do so
  • Check the radio button next to where it says Domain and enter the domain name that the Small Business Server 2003  belongs to
  • Click OK
  • At which point you will be prompted for a username and password for a user that has permissions to add the computer to the domain
  • Once you have added your credentials and click OK you will then be informed the server requires restarting.  Please restart to resume the migration

Step 3 – Prepare Active Directory for Windows 2008 R2 Server

The first step of this process is to raise the Functional Levels of the SBS 2003 server.  This involves raising the domain and forest functional level of Active Directory and the Operational mode of Exchange Server.

To raise the Domain Functional Level do the following:

  • Click Start > Administrative Tools > Active Directory Users and Computers
  • Right click on the domain name and select Raise Domain Functional Level
  • In the drop down box select Windows Server 2003 and click OK (if this has already been done don’t worry)

To raise the Forest Functional Level do the following:

  • Click Start > Administrative Tools > Active Directory Domains and Trusts
  • Right click where it says Active Directory Domains and Trusts and select Raise Forest Functional Level.

And we also need to raise the Exchange Operational Mode.  To do this, you need to do the following:

  • Click Start > All Programs > Microsoft Exchange > System Manager
  • Right click on the Organisation name right at the top of the list and select properties
  • In the dialogue box check the Operational Mode, if it says Mixed Mode click the Change Mode button and say yes to the dialogue box asking if you want to change to native mode

Before we can add the Windows 2008 Server as a domain controller to the SBS 2003 domain, we need to prepare Active Directory.

To do this use the following procedure whilst working on the Small Business Server

  • Insert the Windows 2008 DVD in to the Small Business Server.  Ignore the autorun message that appears telling you this version is incompatible by clicking OK
  • Open a command prompt (Start > Run > CMD) and run the commands below

NOTE: X: refers to the drive letter that has been assigned to your DVD Drive.

  • X:\support\adprep\adprep32  /forestprep

After the above command you will be prompted to confirm you wish to proceed by typing the letter C and pressing Enter

  • X:\support\adprep\adprep32  /domainprep
  • X:\support\adprep\adprep32  /domainprep /gpprep
  • X:\support\adprep\adprep32  /rodcprep

Step 4 – Make Windows 2008 R2 Server a Domain Controller of the Existing Small Business Server 2003 Domain

To make the Windows 2008 Server a Domain Controller is fairly straight forward, we simply click Start > Run  and type DCPROMO click OK.

This will check that the Active Directory Services Binaries are installed and if they are not, it will install them.  It will then start the Active Directory Domain Services Installation Wizard.

On the first screen, there is no need to check the ‘Use Advanced mode Installation’ check box, just simply click next.  On the operating System Compatibility screen click next.

On the ‘Choose a Deployment Configuration’ screen, select the radio box for Existing Forest and Add a domain controller to an existing domain.  Then Click next.

On the ‘Network credentials’ screen, the name of the domain should have been detected automatically.  Check this is correct.  If you are logged in as a user that has domain admin privileges then you can use the My Current logged on credentials option.  If not, click the set button and add the username and password that has domain admin privileges as shown in the screen above.  Click Next.

The following screen will give you the results of a domain search and ask you which domain you want to add this domain controller to.  As you are upgrading Small Business Server there should only be one.  Click Next.

The next screen will give you an option to select the site for the new domain controller.  If you have more than one Active Directory Site ensure that you select the correct one if it hasn’t been done by default.  Click next.

On the ‘Additional Domain Controller Options’ screen, make sure that both the DNS Server and the Global Catalog options are both checked.  Click Next.  The error message regarding DNS Delegation can safely be ignored.  Click Yes on this dialog to continue.

If you have separate folders where you want to store your log files, SYSVOL share and the Active Directory database then these can be specified on the next screen.  To be honest I keep them all as defaults.  Once done, click Next.

On the following screen, you are asked to set a password for Directory Services Restore Mode Administrator (DSRM).  Please note this is NOT the Domain Administrator password.  This password is used to boot the Domain Controller into Directory Services Restore Mode which is used for recovering corrupt/deleted/failed Domain Controllers.  Make a note of this password and keep it somewhere safe (in a fire safe for example).

Click Next on the following 2 screens.  The wizard will then start the promotion of the server to a domain controller (I always check the box on this screen to reboot on completion – This way you can leave it and come back to it knowing that it will be ready to continue).

Once rebooted your new server will be a domain controller, DNS server and Global Catalog server in your Small Business Server Domain.

Step 5 – Transfer DHCP Service

By default the Small Business Server will be the DHCP Server (if it isn’t and you’re using something else for DHCP, then you will simply need to update the DNS configuration this device is giving out so that it points to the 2008 Server instead of the 2003 Server) we will need to transfer this to the new server.

We can start this process by installing the DHCP Service.

To install DHCP, open up Server Manager and under Roles, click Add Role. From the list, select DHCP Server and click Next then next on the Introduction to DHCP Server screen.

On the network Connection Bindings screen you should have your primary IP address listed.  As you will be installing Exchange on this server it’s not recommended to have a multi-homed server but if you do make sure the LAN card and IP is the only one selected.  Click next.

NOTE: A multi-homed server is a server that has multiple IP addresses assigned to multiple Network Interface Cards.  Normally these types of servers would be used as routers.  Whilst Exchange can be made to work in this environment, it’s not recommended.

On the Specify IPv4 DNS Server Settings check the following settings:

  • Check the parent domain name is correct
  • Make sure that the IP Address listed for Preferred DNS server IPv4 Address is the address of the new Windows 2008 Server
  • Remove any entry in the Alternate DNS Server IPv4 Settings as these will not be required
  • Click next

Click next accepting the default settings on the WINS screen.

On the Add or Edit DHCP Scopes screen, click Add.  This will present you with the Add Scope dialog box.

On this screen enter the following details:

  • scope name
  • the start IP address
  • the end IP address

(This should be the same as the DHCP Scope you have configured on the Small Business Server).

  • Uncheck the box that says Activate this scope (we don’t want it just yet)
  • The subnet mask should have been calculated automatically but if it isn’t correct then please change it to ensure it is
  • Enter the default gateway; this will be the router on your network

On the Specify IPv4 DNS Server Settings check the following settings:

  • Check the parent domain name is correct
  • Make sure that the IP Address listed for Preferred DNS server IPv4 Address is the address of the new Windows 2008 Server
  • Remove any entry in the Alternate DNS Server IPv4 Settings as these will not be required
  • Click next

Click next accepting the default settings on the WINS screen.

On the Add or Edit DHCP Scopes screen, click Add.  This will present you with the Add Scope dialog box.

On this screen enter the following details:

  • scope name
  • the start IP address
  • the end IP address

(This should be the same as the DHCP Scope you have configured on the Small Business Server).

  • Uncheck the box that says Activate this scope (we don’t want it just yet)
  • The subnet mask should have been calculated automatically but if it isn’t correct then please change it to ensure it is
  • Enter the default gateway; this will be the router on your network

You will notice in the scope I am creating, I have started from 192.168.10.15 this is so that I have 15 addresses that I can assign to fixed addresses.  My Small Business Server and Windows 2003 server will have an address below 192.168.10.15 but I might also have printers, photocopiers, and wireless access points that also need fixed IP addresses.  I have also left 192.168.10.254 available to use for my router.

Once you have completed all the details, click OK and then Next.

Accept the default setting on the ‘Configure DHCPv6 Stateless Mode’ and the Specify IPv6 DNS Server Settings.

On the ‘Authorize DHCP Server’ screen, select to use the current credentials and click Next, then Install on the confirmation screen.

The DHCP Server service is now installed on the Windows 2008 server.

Before we can switch over, we need to make some changes to the Small Business Server DHCP settings.  Whilst we can just turn one off and turn the other on this will cause you to have to release and renew the settings on the client machines manually for them to pick up the new DHCP Service.  The alternative is to wait the 4 days before your client machines request an IP address renewal.

To make the required changes, do the following on the Small Business Server:

  • Navigate to Start > Administrative Tools > DHCP this will open the DHCP snap-in
  • Right click on the Scope listed under your Small Business Server and select properties

In the section titled ‘Lease duration for DHCP clients’ we are going to change it to 2 hours from the default of 8 days.  Click OK

Then under Address Leases, highlight all DHCP Leases, right click and select delete.  NOTE:  If you have any reserved addresses make sure they are not highlighted otherwise they will be deleted also.

This action will cause all DHCP clients to renew their addresses and gain an address that has a 2 hour lease.  Check the Address Leases and refresh until you are happy that all the clients now have an IP address. (You might want to leave this overnight just to make absolutely sure)

Once you are happy that all the clients have now got a 2 hour lease from the Windows 2008 server do the following:

  • Navigate to Start > Administrative Tools > DHCP
  • Expand the Windows 2008 servername and IPv4 then right click on the scope listed
  • Select Activate

This will start the DHCP Service on the 2008 server and deactivate the service on the Small Business Server (this will happen automatically because when Small Business Server detects another DHCP server on the network it shuts its own down).

You will now find that in approximately 1 to 2 hours time, all your clients will start picking up IP addresses from the Windows 2008 Server.

You can now disable the DHCP Server service on the Small Business Server.  DO NOT disable the DHCP Client service, as this plays a part in DNS registration.

Now that all the clients are using the new Windows 2008 Server for DHCP and DNS, we need to make sure that the Small Business Server is also using the Windows 2008 Server for DNS.  To do this modify the TCP/IP properties of the network card and change the Primary DNS servers IP address to that of the Windows 2008 Server.  Do not enter anything in the Secondary DNS server.

Once you have done this restart the NETLOGON service so that the DNS entries are added to the Windows 2008 DNS.

Step 6 – Install Exchange 2010

Because we performed all the diagnostic checks at the start, the installation of Exchange 2010 should be fairly straight forward.  Please note that even though the installation of any version of Exchange Server on a domain controller is supported by Microsoft, it is not a recommended configuration.  But since we are migrating from Small Business Server the chances are you still want to stick with a single server configuration.

The first step is to install the pre-requisites on Windows 2008 to allow the Exchange 2010 installation to complete.  This can be done very easily using the Windows PowerShell.

To do this, please use the following steps:

  • Click Start > All Programs > Accessories > Windows PowerShell

Once the PowerShell is opened run the following commands:

  • Import-Module ServerManager

There is no notification this has completed you will just see a flashing cursor waiting for input.  This command will allow us to add server roles and features via the PowerShell command.

  • Add-WindowsFeature NET-Framework,RSAT-ADDS,Web-Server,Web-Basic-Auth,Web-Windows-Auth,Web-Metabase,Web-Net-Ext,Web-Lgcy-Mgmt-Console,WAS-Process-Model,RSAT-Web-Server,Web-ISAPI-Ext,Web-Digest-Auth,Web-Dyn-Compression,NET-HTTP-Activation,RPC-Over-HTTP-Proxy –Restart

This command will install all the pre-requisites for the Mailbox, Hub Transport and Client Access roles on to the Windows 2008 Server.  This will replicate what you currently have on the Small Business Server.
Once the server has restarted after the above command, launch the Windows Powershell again and run the following command:

  • Set-Service NetTcpPortSharing -StartupType Automatic

This will set the Net.Tcp Port Sharing Service to Automatic instead of Manual

Install the Microsoft Office Filter Pack (which you should have downloaded earlier from the top list of required software).

Once we have done this, we need to prepare Active Directory for the Exchange 2010 installation.

Unlike previous versions, Exchange 2010 will detect if the schema updates have been done and do them if not, I prefer to see this happen.

To prepare Active Directory for Exchange 2010 we need to do the following:

  • Insert the Exchange 2010 DVD in to the Windows 2008 Server
  • Open a command prompt (Start > Run > CMD)
  • Run D:\setup /PrepareLegacyExchangePermissions
  • Run D:\setup /PrepareSchema
  • There is an additional command which is: setup /PrepareAD /OrganizationName: but I am going to let the Exchange Server installation do this part

Start the Exchange installation from the DVD.  On the initial splash screen that opens, click Step 3: Choose Exchange Language Options, select the appropriate option then click Step 4: Install Microsoft Exchange.  The Exchange Installation Wizard will then start.

The first screen you see is the Introduction screen, click Next.  Read, agree to and accept the license agreement screen.

This screen allows us to choose the type of installation.  As it’s assumed the Exchange 2010 server is a direct replacement for Small Business Server and all roles will be installed on a single server, we simply select Typical Exchange Server Installation and Click next.

If we were separating our roles out on to different servers we would select Custom Exchange Server Installation and then click next.

This screen allows us to specify what URL will be used for accessing our Outlook Web App from outside of the network.  Whatever you put in here you will need to make sure you have a DNS A record for it in your EXTERNAL DNS server.  In the later steps you will also need to use this name in your SSL Certificate Request. (CSR)

Check the box ‘The Client Access role server will be internet-facing’ and then specify the URL you will use, do not add https:// or anything at the end i.e. /owa.  Click next.

This screen is asking us to specify the Exchange 2003 server that the installation will create a routing group connector for.  This is essential for mailflow between the servers.  Click Browse, the list should be generated automatically and you will be able to select the Small Business Server from the list.  Click OK and then next.

Choose on the next screen if you wish to participate in the Customer Improvement program and then click next.  At this point the readiness checks will be performed to ensure your infrastructure is ready for Exchange 2010.

The results of the readiness check should show a warning on the Organisation Prerequisites, this is normal and it’s because we didn’t run the setup /PrepareAD /OrganizationName: command earlier on.  This can safely be ignored as the setup will perform this task for us.

The other cautionary warning you will see on my screen capture is simply because I haven’t installed the Office Filter Pack so you will only see this if you didn’t follow the step earlier.  Once you click install, the wizard will Install Exchange Server 2010.  And we are looking for the screen below.  All green.

Now that Exchange is installed, using the Exchange Management Console, navigate to Server Configuration > Hub Transport.  Here there will be 2 Receive Connectors listed.

The one we will be dealing with is the one that starts with the word Default and is followed by the name of the Exchange 2010 server.  Right click on this Receive Connector and select properties.  Under the Permission Groups tab, check the box for Anonymous Users.  If this box is not checked then servers sending mail to you will not be able to connect.  Your e-mails with therefore be rejected.

One final task before we move on, is to reconfigure any firewall/router rules you may have for ports 25 and 443 to allow the Exchange 2010 server to now deal with SMTP traffic and Outlook Web App.

Step 7 – Installing Exchange 2010 SSL Certificate

Exchange 2010 installs with a self-signed certificate by default.  Whilst this will work, it will cause browser errors in the form of untrusted websites, Outlook errors for Autodiscover (which is used for free/busy information & Offline Address Book) and errors when using mobile devices and Outlook Anywhere.  Whilst for the most part there are ways around these problems, I won’t be covering them in this article because my recommendation, as any other Exchange specialist would recommend, would be to use a 3rd party certificate.  You can purchase certificates that work with all versions of Exchange from http://www.exchangecertificates.com

Unlike earlier versions of Exchange, we have a nice easy to use wizard in the Exchange Management Console for certificate generation.  This makes installing commercial certificates in Exchange 2010 much easier and less prone to error.

To start the New Exchange Certificate wizard do the following:

  • Click Start > All Programs > Microsoft Exchange Server 2010
  • Navigate to Microsoft Exchange On-Premises > Server Configuration
  • In the Actions pane click New Exchange Certificate

This will start the New Exchange Certificate Wizard

 

Enter a friendly name for the certificate. This can be whatever you like, but standard practice is to use the company name or something that can identify your company.  Click Next

DO NOT Select to create a wildcard certificate unless you plan on buying a certificate for your entire domain, which is not required for Exchange to function.  Click Next

On the following screen pull down the arrows for:

  • Client Access Server (Outlook Web App)
  • Client Access Server (Exchange ActiveSync)
  • Client Access Server (Web Services, Outlook Anywhere, and Autodiscover)

Make sure all the URLs are correct (examples can be found in my screen capture above) and then click Next.

Confirm the entries on the next page (it’s worth noting on this screen that the address shown in bold is what is known as a Common Name).  This could be important later as Outlook Anywhere requires the common name to be the same as the URL used in the RPC connection.  In most of my configurations I use the owa.gkvirtualdomain.co.uk as the common name.  To do this, highlight the URL and click the Set as Common Name option.  Click next when finished.

You then need to complete your organisation information as shown in the screen above.  Then click New on the next screen. And then finish.

You can then open the file you have specified to create the request with, copy and paste the entire contents into the 3rd party vendors website and follow their instructions for submitting it.

Once you receive the signed certificate, right click on the certificate request located as above and select Complete Pending Request.  Follow the instructions to import the certificate you have just received.

Step 8 – Migrate Exchange Data

Now we have Exchange installed, it’s time to migrate the data over.  We will start with the easy part as a bit of a break from the previous 6 steps.

To migrate the user mailboxes, open Exchange Management Console and navigate to Recipient Configuration > Mailbox. Highlight the mailboxes you want to move (the mailboxes that are on the Exchange 2003 server will appear as Legacy Mailboxes, as pictured above), right click on them and select New Local Move Request.

When the New Local Move Request wizard opens, click the browse option to select the Windows 2008/Exchange 2010 server mail store and click OK, then click next.

On the following screen, select what you would like to do when the wizard encounters corrupt messages. You have two options: either to skip only the corrupt message or to skip the whole mailbox.  Click next and on the following screen click New.

Once the move requests have been verified, we should see the screen above.  All the mailboxes you selected should hopefully show a green tick.  Please note that during the move mailbox process, the user will not have access to their mailbox as it is moved “offline”.

The next stage is to migrate the Public Folders. To do this complete the following steps on the SBS 2003 Server:

  • Click Start > All Programs > Microsoft Exchange Server > System Manager
  • Navigate to Administrative Groups > First Administrative Group > Servers > Servername > First Storage Group
  • Right click on the Public Folder Store and select Move All Replicas.  The only option that should appear in the list is your Exchange 2010 server.  Click OK.

Now that we have moved the data to the Exchange 2010 server it’s best to leave this for a day or so to a) make sure all the data is moved before we perform any other Exchange related tasks. b) allow all the outlook clients to update automatically with the new server settings.

Step 9 – Migrate SharePoint Services

If you are using companyweb for an intranet/document storage etc. then you will also need to migrate this.  If you are not using SharePoint then simply skip this step.

First thing you will need to do is to install the Windows SharePoint Services 3.0 which you downloaded as part of the pre-requisites.  This is the free version of SharePoint Services.  Only the version with Integrated Service Pack 2 will install on Windows 2008 R2.

Once you have downloaded Windows SharePoint Services 3.0, double click to start the installation on the Windows 2008 Server.  Read, agree to and accept the license agreement and click continue.  Select Basic installation.  This will install the standard single site installation.

Once the installation has finished, launch the SharePoint Products and Technologies Configuration Wizard.  Click next on the welcome screen and Yes to confirm you are OK with the services being restarted.
NOTE: While IIS restarts, the Outlook Web App will be temporarily unavailable.

On the final screen, check the box to ‘Run the SharePoint Products and Technologies Configuration Wizard now’ and click Close.

Click Next on the welcome screen and Yes to confirm you are OK with the services being restarted.  The wizard will run through again and complete the configuration.   Once finished click close.

Make sure you install the 32bit version on the Small Business Server and the 64bit version on the Windows 2008 server.

The next step we need to complete is to run a pre-scan on the current database to allow Windows SharePoint Service 3.0 to upgrade it when we move it to the Windows 2008 server.
Perform the following steps to achieve this:

  • Copy the C:\Program Files\Common Files\Microsoft Shared\Web Server Extensions\12\Bin\prescan.exe which can be found on the Windows 2008 server to the Small Business Server.  It doesn’t matter where you put this
  • Launch a command prompt (Start > Run > CMD)
  • From the command prompt run: prescan /V http://companyweb and press enter

Once you have done this still, working on the Small Business server perform the following tasks:

  • Navigate to Start > Administrative Tools > Internet Information Services (IIS)
  • Navigate to servername > Web Sites and right click on companyweb and select stop

We now need to launch the SQL Server Management Studio Express, this can be done by:

  • Click Start > All Programs > Microsoft SQL Server 2005 > SQL Server management Studio Express
  • In the dropdown list on the connection screen, ensure that SERVERNAME\SHAREPOINT is selected and click connect

Before we perform any additional steps, we are going to take a backup of the database used for companyweb.  Follow these steps to perform a backup:

  • Expand the Databases folder
  • Locate the database called STS_SBSSERVERNAME_1 right click on the database and select Tasks then Backup

On the backup screen, the only section you need to change is the destination.  Make sure the “backup to” is set to disk and then click Add.

If you receive the error message above, don’t panic, it’s easily solved by using the following procedure:

  • Click Start > Run > Type regedit > Click OK
  • Navigate to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Microsoft SQL Server\SharePoint\MSSQLServer
  • Right click and create a new String Value called BackupDirectory
  • Double click the new value to edit it and give it a value of C:

Close Regedit and try clicking the Add button again on the Backup Screen, specify a location for where you would like to save the backup and click OK.

We are now going to detach the database from the SBS 2003 server.  Still in SQL Server Management Studio Express, right-click on the STS_SBSSERVERNAME_1 select tasks and then Detach.

Locate the Database and Log file, which by default will be located in C:\ Program Files\Microsoft SQL Server\MSSQL$SharePoint\Data on the Small Business Server.  You need to copy the STS_SBSSERVERNAME_1.MDF  and STS_SBSSERVERNAME_1_LOG.LDF files to a folder on the destination server, don’t copy them in to the SQL Server data folder.

Working on the Windows 2008 server perform the following steps:

  • Navigate to Start > All Programs > Microsoft SQL Server 2005 > SQL Server Management Studio Express
  • On the connection window enter \\.\pipe\mssql$microsoft##ssee\sql\query in the servername box and click connect
  • Right click on Databases and click attach
  • Click the Add button and select the STS_SBSSERVERNAME_1.MDF you copied from the Small Business Server earlier

We now need to create the website in IIS.  To do this, do the following:

  • Navigate to Start > Administrative Tools > Internet Information Services (IIS) Manager
  • Expand the servername
  • Right click on Sites and select New Site

On the Add Web Site wizard, enter a site name of companyweb, specify a physical path and host name of companyweb as shown in the image above.  You can change these if you wish, but keeping the site name/host name the same will mean the URL your clients use will not change.

Launch DNS manager from Start > Administrative Tools > DNS.  Expand the forward lookup zone for your internal domain name and locate the CNAME record called companyweb.  This should currently be using the Small Business Server’s server name.  Double-click this record to edit it and change it to use the Windows 2008 server instead.

And then finally we need to setup SharePoint Service.  To do this perform the following steps:

  • Navigate to Start > Administrative Tools > SharePoint 3.0 Central Administration
  • Click Application Management
  • Select Create or Extend Web Application
  • On the next screen select  Create a New Web Application

On the screen that appears, complete the fields as listed below.  If nothing is specified, please leave the default settings.

In the IIS Web Site Section choose the following:

  • Use an Existing Website and then select companyweb from the drop down list

In the Security Configuration Section

  • Set Authentication Provider to NTLM
  • Set Allow Anonymous to No
  • Set Use Secure Socket Layers (SSL) to no

In the Application Pool Section

  • Use Existing Application pool and Select companyweb from the drop down box

In the Database Name and Authentication Section

  • Database Server should be set to WINDOWS2008SERVERNAME\Microsoft##SSEE (where WINDOWS2008SERVERNAME is the name of the Windows 2008 Server)
  • Database Name should be set to STS_SBSSERVERNAME_1
  • Database authentication should be set to Windows Authentication (recommended)

In the Search Server Section

  • Pull down the drop down list and select the Windows 2008 server from the list

Click OK and your SharePoint Website will be created.  Once the wizard has finished, from an Internet Browser type in http://companyweb/ and the companyweb website on the Windows 2008 server will be displayed.

Step 10 – Migrate shared user data

NOTE: This section is currently under review as I have been advised that this process does not work correctly.

Because this step is so generic and it could be different for every server, I am not going to go into specifics, only the more general steps that need to be accomplished.

The shares that are in use on the Small Business Server need to be recreated on the Windows 2008 server.  One way we can do this is backup the share definitions from the Small Business Server and restore them to the Windows 2008 server.  This involves working in the registry so please be careful and follow the instructions accurately.  The instructions on how to do this can be found here: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/125996

The next stage is to restore the actual data to the shares.  This is a lot easier if you ensure that the folder structure you have on the Small Business Server for shares is replicated on the Windows 2008 server.  You can simply use Windows Backup to backup and restore the data.  This will keep all permissions and ownership information intact.

You will then need to update any login scripts which will be located in \\LOCALHOST\SYSVOL on the Windows 2008 server to ensure that any mapped drives are updated.

You will also need to update any attributes that may be under the Profiles tab in Active Directory Users and Computers for the users themselves.

Step 11 – Uninstall Exchange 2003 from Small Business Server 2003

Hopefully you are arriving at this step a day or two after you have migrated all the mailboxes, if not then I would recommend you leave it for a day or two just to allow all client computers to automatically update the Exchange server setting in outlook.  If you uninstall Exchange 2003 from the Small Business Server and this hasn’t happened then the clients will have to be changed manually.

To perform this task we will need Small Business Server 2003 CD 2, which will be asked for during the uninstallation.  Before we can do this though, there are a few steps we need to perform otherwise we will not be able to uninstall it.

If you use Recipient Policies that are Manage Mailbox policies, then these will need to be removed.  Likewise, if you have Recipient Policies that are used for both e-mail address definition and mailbox management, the settings defined under Mailbox Manager Settings will need to be removed.  You DO NOT need to remove your e-mail address policies.

The Recipient Update Service is not used in Exchange 2010 and is therefore not required, so it can be removed.  To do this you will need to use ADSI Edit.  This can be done by using the following procedure:

  • click Start > Run > MMC > Click OK
  • Select File then Add/Remove Snap-in
  • Click Add and select ADSI Edit and click Add, then close and OK
  • Right click on the ADSI Edit and select ‘Connect to’.  From the drop down under ‘Select a well known Naming Context’, select Configuration and click OK
  • Expand Configuration > Services > Microsoft Exchange > Organisation Name > Address List Container > Recipient Update Services
  • Right click on Recipient Update Service (Enterprise Configuration) and select Delete.  There may also be a Recipient Update Service (ORGNAME) this also needs to be deleted

Only delete the Recipient Update Service entries under the container; DO NOT delete the container itself or any other entries

The final step in preparation for uninstalling Exchange Server 2003 is to delete the routing group connectors that would have been created as part of the installation.  I have highlighted them in the image below.  Simply right click on each connector and select delete.

We are now ready to uninstall Exchange 2003.  To do this, navigate to Start > Control Panel > Add or Remove Programs.  From the list of installed applications, highlight Windows Small Business Server 2003 and click Change/Remove.

Click next on the Welcome screen, and next on the screen that follows.  Once the component screen opens pull down the drop down next to Exchange Server and select remove, as shown below. Then click next and next again.

Step 12 – Transfer all 5 FSMO roles to Windows 2008 Domain Controller

Caution needs to be taken when performing this next step.  I would advise that ALL of the previous steps need to be completed before this is done as Small Business Server MUST hold all 5 FSMO roles.
Once you are ready, the roles can be transferred as follows.  Working on the Windows 2008 server do the following:

  • Click Start > Administrative Tools > Active Directory Users and Computers
  • Right click on the domain name and select Operations Masters.  You will see the screen below.
  • On each tab (RID, PDC & Infrastructure) click the change button.
  • Accept the confirmation that you want each role to be transferred.

That is 3 of the 5 roles transferred.  To do the next one, which is the Domain Naming Master we need to do the following:

  • Click Start > Administrative Tools > Active Directory Domains and Trusts.
  • Right click where it says Active Directory Domains and Trusts and select Operations Master.
  • Once again click the Change button and say yes to the notification dialog.

4 down with 1 to go.  To move the Schema Master role we need to do the following:

  • Click Start > Run and type regsvr32 schmmgmt.dll
  • Click OK to the confirmation
  • Click Start > Run and type MMC and click OK
  • Select File > Add/Remove Snap-in from the console
  • From the list select Active Directory Schema, click Add
  • Click Close and OK.
  • Right click on Active Directory Schema and select Change Active Directory Domain Controller
  • Choose the Windows 2008 Server from the list and click OK
  • Click OK on the warning Dialog box.
  • Right click on Active Directory Schema and select Operations Master
  • Click the Change button and say yes to the notification dialog

That’s all the FSMO roles transferred from the Small Business Server.  The next and final step is to demote the server from being a Domain Controller.

Step 13 – DCPROMO SBS 2003 server so it is no longer a domain controller and remove from network

This is the final step of the migration process.  If you have made it this far, well done!  This is the easy bit!

The first thing we need to do is make sure the Small Business Server is not a Global Catalog Server.  Click on Start > Administrative Tools > Active Directory Sites and Services.  Locate the Small Business Server as shown in the screen shot below.

Right click on NTDS settings located under the Small Business Server and select properties.  Remove the check from the Global Catalog check box and click OK.  Close Active Directory Sites and Services snap-in.

The final step is to run DCPROMO.  To do this, do the following:

  • Click Start > Run and type DCPROMO and click OK
  • Click next on the Welcome screen
  • DO NOT check the box that says “This server is the last domain controller in the domain” and Click next
  • Enter a new administrator password for the local administrator user and click next

The server will then remove Active Directory Services from the Small Business Server and it will no longer be a Domain Controller.

Once this has finished, allow the server to restart, login and then shut it down.  You have now completed the migration.

If you are still with me, well done!  There are a few sections of additional reading below if you would like to know some more detail about some of the processes we have just completed.  There is an excellent article from EE Expert tigermatt around the purpose of the FSMO roles which you will find under the further reading section.

Further Reading

Move/Migrate Sharepoint Services: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc288664.aspx
Move last legacy Exchange Server: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb288905(EXCHG.80).aspx
Demystifying the Active Directory FSMO Roles by tigermatt: http://tigermatt.wordpress.com/2010/04/03/demystifying-the-active-directory-fsmo-roles/

 

This guide is intended for migrating Windows 2003 Standard with Exchange 2003 to Windows Small Business Server 2008.

You will need the following:

Before we can start the migration process there are a few things we need to do on the Windows 2003 server.

  1. First and foremost make sure you have a SYSTEM STATE backup.  This can be done with the built in Backup tools or a 3rd party product, but this needs to be done PRIOR to any of the following steps and is probably the most important step of the whole process.
  2. If the Windows 2003 server has more than 1 Network card then all apart from the LAN connection will need to be disabled.
  3. The assumption is that this is a single server scenario and DHCP/DNS are also installed on the server you are migrating from.  Therefore please ensure that the Windows 2003 server has got ONLY it’s own IP address configured in the TCP/IP properties of the network card.  There should be no external DNS servers listed here.
  4. The gateway should be the LAN IP address of your router.
  5. If you have made any changes to the above configuration it’s best to restart the server so that DNS is updated and all the services are bound to the correct adapter.
  6. Perform all available Microsoft Updates.  Windows 2003 should at a minimum have Service Pack 2 installed along with Service Pack 2 for Exchange 2003.  When you run Windows Update check the link across the top of the screen for Microsoft Update this will ensure you receive updates for all products.

Prepare the 2003 Server

Raise the domain Functional Level of the  Windows 2003 Domain.  In Active Directory Users and Computers, right click on the domain and select Raise Domain Functional Level. This needs to be set to Windows Server 2003. If it is not already then you will have the option to change it.

Raise the Forest Functional Level of Windows 2003 Forest.  In Active Directory Domains and Trusts right click Active Directory Domains and Trusts and select Raise Forest Functional Level.  This needs to be set to Windows Server 2003. Again if it’s not already you will have the option to change it.

Using Exchange System Manager right click at the top of the tree where it says Organisation Name (Exchange) and check that the Exchange Functional level is set to Native Mode (no pre-Exchange 2000 servers)

Once that’s done run the Exchange Best Practice Analyzer.  The test you need to run is the Exchange 2007 readiness check.  This scan will tell you if there is anything that needs to be resolved prior to the installation of Exchange 2007 which is performed as part of the Small Business Server 2008 install.

Prepare Active Directory

The first step of preparing for the installation of SBS2008 is to run sourcetool.exe.  This will prepare the forest and domain and change Exchange from Mixed mode to Native mode (Exchange 2007 will not install if it’s not in Native mode).

Insert the SBS DVD into the Windows 2003 Server (if you copy the sourcetool.exe to the Windows 2003 server make sure you copy the whole tools folder) and then from the tools folder run the sourcetool.exe.

The first thing you will be asked is to confirm you have a FULL backup, I cannot stress this enough this is where all the changes to your Active Directory start happening, so even if you took one at the start of this process, take another one now!

So check the box and click Next and the tool will run through and perform the required updates.

Once done you will be presented with a screen that tells you it has successfully prepared the server for migration and you will have the option to create an Answerfile.  I say ‘option’ because it will let you close the wizard without creating one, but if you don’t have an Answerfile you cannot put the SBS2008 installation into Migration Mode.

 

The message at the top of the screen indicates that the utility “Cannot prepare the Source server for migration” this is normal.  It is because it cannot execute WindowsServer2003-KB943494-x86-ENU.exe.  The screen indicates the location of the log file.  To confirm this is why it has failed open the log file and look for the entry:

     Current version: 5.2.3790.131072
     Service pack version = 2
     Running D:\tools\KB943494\WindowsServer2003-KB943494-x86-ENU.exe /quiet /norestart
     Package returned: 1603 (0x643)
     ProgressPage: Task Finished.  Succcess=False

I have highlighted the link to create an Answerfile because the very first SBS migration I did I missed it.  It doesn’t jump out at you and make itself obvious that it’s a link.  Perhaps this should have been a button to press?  Click the link and then fill the form in as below

The important sections of the Answerfile are:

  1. Installation Type, make sure you select Migration from Existing Server (join existing domain) otherwise it won’t!
  2. I personally like to uncheck “Run unattended” so that I can see what is going on
  3. Select the Time Zone you will be using.  IMPORTANT if the time and timezones of both servers don’t match then the migration may fail.
  4. Source and Destination Server information.  The destination server information is what will be set during installation and during the DCPROMO process so use the actual name the server will have.

Once you have filled in the required information scroll right to the end and click Save As.  This will create an SBSAnswerfile.xml file that will be used during the installation of SBS2008.  Copy this file to a USB pen drive or a floppy drive.

Small Business Server 2008 Installation

To install SBS2008 if your server has 2 network cards, make sure that one of them is disabled in the BIOS. If you don’t, this can cause communication problems with the 2 servers.  I have seen some have problems and others that don’t but personally I would rather be safe than sorry.

Set your boot device priority so that it’s First DVD/CDROM Drive and Second Hard Disk.  The important thing to make sure is it’s not going to try and boot from either the floppy drive or the USB drive.  Insert your disk/drive with the Answerfile on and boot from the SBS2008 DVD.

Follow the instructions to install SBS, it’s fairly self explanatory.  The installation will expand files and then reboot.  After the second reboot it will check for the Answerfile, either on the local storage, floppy drive or USB drive.  If it successfully finds one you will see this screen.

At this stage you will again be prompted to confirm you have a good backup and can then continue.  On the remaining screens confirm the information is correct for the new server and the existing server.  You will then receive the expanding files screen.

This section of the installation can take anything from 45 minutes to 2 hours.  A lot of that time it will look as if it hasn’t moved.  Whatever you do do not think it has failed and turn it off.  If it has failed it will tell you.  Once this section has finished the server will again reboot.  And the screen we all hope to see is this one.

 

You now have a Windows 2003 Domain Controller with Exchange 2003 installed and an SBS2008 server with Exchange 2007 installed.  The next step is the data migration from Exchange 2003 to Exchange 2007.

Data Migration

So that we can remove Exchange 2003 from the older server we need to migrate the user mailboxes and Public Folders to Exchange 2007, this would normally be done as part of the Migrate to SBS wizard but as the source server is not SBS we are not able to do this.

To move the mailboxes launch Microsoft Exchange Management Console and navigate to Recipient Configuration > Mailboxes.  You will see that all the mailboxes that reside on the Exchange 2003 server will be listed as a Legacy Mailbox.  Right click on the mailbox and select Move Mailbox.  Follow the wizard to move the mailboxes to the SBS2008 server.  You can bulk select all the users and the move wizard will then work through them 4 at a time.  This can take a while depending on how many users you have and how big their mailboxes are.

To move public folders on the Exchange 2003 server launch Exchange System Manager.  Navigate to Administrative Groups > First Administrative Group (or if you Exchange 2003 admin group has a different name select this one) > Servers > servername (your Exchange 2003 Server) > First Storage Group  > Public Folder Store (servername).  Right Click on Public Folder Store and select Move All Replicas select the SBS2008 server and click OK.  Once you have allowed to for the public folders to replicate right click the Public Folder Store in Exchange System Manager and select Delete.  A dialogue box will pop up informing you that this store is the default store for one or more Mailbox Stores, click OK to this dialogue and then select the SBS2008 server from the list and click OK.  Click OK to confirm the delete.

If the store has not finished replicating (as we are on Exchange 2003 Service Pack 2) you will not be able to delete the store.

Rehome the Offline Address book.  In Exchange System Manager on the 2003 server navigate to Recipients > Offline Address Lists and for each address list right click and select properties.  Click the Browse button next to Offline Address list server and enter the name of the SBS2008 server. Click OK.  Do this for each Offline Address List

If you use Recipient Policies that are Manage Mailbox policies then these will need to be removed and likewise if you have Recipient Policies that are used for both e-mail address definition and mailbox management the settings defined under Mailbox Manager Settings will need to be removed.  You DO NOT need to remove your e-mail address policies.

Using Exchange System Manager, navigate to Administrative Groups and right click on Exchange Administrative Group (FYDIBOHFSPDLT) and select New, then Public Folder Container.  Then under First Administrative Group, expand Folders and drag and drop the Public Folders container from First Administrative Group to the folder you have just created under Exchange Administrative Group (FYDIBOHFSPDLT).

The Recipient Update Service is not used in Exchange 2007 and is therefore not required so can be removed.  To do this you will need to use ADSI Edit.  This can be done by clicking Start > Run > mmc <click OK> Under File select Add/Remove Snap-in > Click Add and select ADSI Edit and click Add, then close and OK.  Right click on the ADSI Edit and select Connect to from the drop down under Select a well known Naming Context select Configuration and click OK

Expand Configuration > Services > Microsoft Exchange > Organisation Name > Address List Container > Recipient Update Services right click on Recipient Update Service (Enterprise Configuration) and select Delete.  There may also be a Recipient Update Service (ORGNAME) this also needs to be deleted.  Only delete the Recipient Update Service entries under the container DO NOT DELETE THE CONTAINER ITSELF OR ANY OTHER ENTRIES

The final step in preparation for uninstalling Exchange Server 2003 is to delete the routing group connectors that would have been created as part of the installation.  I have highlighted them in the image below.  Simply right click on each connector and select delete.

Remove Exchange Server 2003

Now that you have transferred all the mailboxes, public folders and offline address lists, it’s time to remove Exchange Server 2003.  To do this go to Start > Control Panel > Add/Remove Programs. From the list, select Microsoft Exchange and click Change/Remove.  When the Exchange wizard opens click Next and then from the Action drop down select remove.

Demote the Windows 2003 Server

Now that Exchange Server 2003 has been removed it’s time to demote the Windows 2003 server so that it’s no longer a domain controller.  This is not an essential part of the process and if the server is going spare and you have the license it’s always worth having a second domain controller on your network.

If you do decide to remove the domain controller then the following will need to be done:

  1. Confirm the Windows 2003 server is not a Global Catalog server.  Open Active Directory Sites and Services navigate to Sites > Default-First-Site-Name > Servers > {name of 2003 Server} and then right click on NTDS Settings select properties and then uncheck the box for Global Catalog
  2. From a command prompt run NETDOM QUERY FSMO to check that all 5 FSMO roles are now with the SBS2008 server.  This should have been done during the installation process of SBS2008 but it’s always good to check
  3. Run DCPROMO. DO NOT select the option for “This Server is the last domain controller in the domain”

SBS Console Wizards

Once you have completed the migration and removed Exchange Server 2003 then you can continue through the SBS Console and complete the following wizards:

  1. Connect to the internet
  2. Set up your Internet Address
  3. Configure a Smart Host for Internet e-mail
  4. Add a trusted certificate (if you need a 3rd party SSL Certificate I would recommend buying a SAN/UCC certificate from http://www.exchangecertificates.com)

When running the Set up your Internet Address wizard it may fail. The reason for this is that some of the system Public folders are Mail Enabled by default.  To ensure that the wizard will run successfully in the Exchange Management Console navigate to Toolbox and double click on Public Folder Management Console.  On my System the folders highlighted below were mail enabled, by simply right clicking on them and selecting Mail Disable will then allow the Internet Address wizard to complete successfully

 

Tidy Up

There are a few other steps that need to be performed to make it a “proper” SBS 2008 setup.  The users and computer accounts need to be moved in Active Directory Users and Computers.  By default in a non Small Business Server environment all your users will be created in Active Directory User and Computers under the Users container for SBS they need to be located in the MyBusiness > Users > SBSUsers container.  You can simply drag and drop them into the correct location.

The Computer accounts should be moved from their default location in Active Directory Users and Computers, which is the Computers container to the MyBusiness > Computers > SBSComputers.

These 2 moves will ensure that the SBS Group Policies are applied to these computers/users and that they receive the correct permissions.

Users will also not appear in the SBS Console, this can be rectified by running the process explained here: http://blogs.technet.com/sbs/archive/2008/09/22/why-are-some-of-my-users-not-displaying-in-the-sbs-console.aspx under How do I use the “Change user rols for user accounts” wizard section.

Further Reading

How to remove the last legacy Exchange Server (already detailed above but here is the technet article): http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb288905(EXCHG.80).aspx